Highly Sensitive Person

For anyone who’s ever felt like they’re too much…

P.S. I love how she ends her poem

Of life she writes.

You ever meet someone who cries for everything?

Someone who has so much emotion and so many feelings that it becomes, sort of a little extra and abnormal?

Hello, I’m just a little extra and abnormal.

My whole life, I’ve been called a crybaby.

I’ve been told that my feelings are too much.

That I love too hard and that I feel too much.

That I’m just a little….. well, extra.

I’ve learned to live with that.

My brain just puts things together more than they should.

I guess my brain cells work much harder than normal.

Every relationship I’ve had was either hindered

or …you could say heightened by my extra-ness.

Depends on how you look at it.

I’m just a little too …. much.

A little extra.

A little abnormal.

But that’s just who I am.

If you can’t deal or you can’t accept it then…

That’s your…

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Wordy Wednesday – Hemingway On First Drafts

Sure, Ernest Hemingway is one of the greatest writers of all time but that doesn’t mean everything he wrote was gold – especially first drafts. Nobody is perfect and neither is writing! Sometimes you just have to power through that hot, steaming pile of…drafts and then edit, rewrite, and repeat.

Wordy Wednesday - Hemingway on First Drafts peaceofwriting.com

 

If You Want Quality Writing, Stop Offering Crap Pay

I was scrolling through freelance writing jobs on LinkedIn yesterday and I came across one that struck a nerve with me. Not because of the company or content topics, but the compensation…$5 for 400 words?! Are you kidding me??? That’s not even minimum wage. I know compensation in freelance work is a tricky subject, especially when it comes to writing. Per word rates and flat fees vary but even $0.01 per word (what the rate in the job post breaks down to) is appallingly low by most standards.freelance writer job ad.jpgQuality content, especially when research is involved, takes time. The sad thing is this isn’t the first time I’ve seen this happen before. The only people I can see accepting this pay rate is people from other countries. Now, there’s nothing wrong with hiring people from overseas but don’t be surprised if there are grammatical errors, plagiarism, and bad/outdated SEO practices like keyword stuffing.

I understand that if you’re a startup or small business, it might be hard to justify paying an experienced freelance writer at a higher rate than somebody who’s cheap. Really, I get it. But you have to ask yourself if it’s worth it in the end. Cutting corners on your content (whether it’s for your website, videos, or sales collateral) may benefit you in the short term, but it won’t lead to more sales in the future and it could even damage your brand’s image.

I think Kristina Halvorson, CEO and founder of Brain Traffic, sums it up best: “Better content means better business.”

A Letter to a Prospective Lexicographer

Curiosity about lexicographers struck me today when I watched a video in my Facebook news feed about the difficulty of defining millennials’ usage of “basic” from the point of view of a lexicographer. I started to wonder, “How does someone become a lexicographer? Maybe this something I can do?!” But after reading this very interesting post, I think I will just admire this calling from afar.

harm·less drudg·ery

We regularly receive letters from people who want an editorial job at M-W and ask for more information on lexicography. It’s my job to answer those letters. Here is the response I wish I could send.

Thank you for your interest in becoming an editor at Merriam-Webster.  I am happy to share some information on the field of lexicography with you.

There are only three formal requirements for becoming a Merriam-Webster editor. First, we respectfully ask that you be a native speaker of English. I think I should break this to you now, before you begin shopping for tweeds and practicing your “tally ho what”: we focus primarily on American English. It’s not that we don’t like British English and its speakers. Indeed, we have an instinctual, deep love for any people who, upon encountering a steamed pudding with currants in it for the first time, thought, “The name of…

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The “Avoid Adverbs” Rule is (Very) Wrong

Ahhh…the poor maligned adverb. I completely agree with Matt Moore’s 2012 post (and not just because we share the same last name) that there is a time and place for adverbs. Yes, we should avoid sloppy writing and be precise with our words, but that doesn’t mean adverbs should be avoided at all costs. On the contrary, adverbs are a basic tenet of language. “To advise young writers to get rid of all their adverbs is like advising a pitcher with four great pitches to throw only three of them — it’s professional suicide,” Cris Freese, Writer’s Digest.

Going on a Date with a Famous Author [Infographic]

Valentine’s Day is a couple days away and if you’re a single booklover like me, you might be spending it relaxing at home and reading a good book with some wine and pizza. Mmmm…pizzaaaa. Wait, what are we talking about? Oh yes, Valentine’s Day and books! Thanks to this infographic by EssayTigers.com, us booklovers can swoon (err, I mean imagine) what it would be like to go on a date with a famous author.

Which author would you most like to go on a date? I love the quote by Jane Austen but the date with Ernest Hemingway sounds dreamy lol.

ValentineFamousAuthors

Unusual Jobs of Famous Writers [Infographic]

I love reading about people’s lives before they became famous because it reminds me they used to be in the same boring boat as the rest of us. While the infographic is fun and done well, it would have been cool to see a greater diversity of authors. (I gotta admit though, Jack London being an oyster pirate is pretty bad ass.)

Original source: https://unplag.com/blog/writers-weird-jobs/

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